Our Children’s Trust Netflix documentary

Our Children’s Trust has exciting news to share: “YOUTH v GOV” – the independent feature-length, award-winning documentary by acclaimed Director Christi Cooper, Barrelmaker Productions, and Vulcan Productions about their federal case, Juliana v. United States – will begin streaming globally on Netflix starting April 29th!
  This is an incredible opportunity to watch the story of the Juliana 21 and their critical climate case, all around the world!
Image courtesy of Barrelmaker Productions
Watch the trailer on the film’s website here!

The global release of this film – streaming in over 30 languages worldwide – will be the first opportunity millions of people around the world will have to see the stories of these brave young Americans. For millions around the world, it will be their first time hearing about this landmark climate case. And it will be the first time they learn about Our Children’s Trust and the critical work they do to help young climate leaders secure their legal rights to a safe climate.

Every person who sees the film can become an ally, an advocate, and a voice speaking out alongside and in support of the Juliana youth. The plaintiffs await a court decision that, if favorable, could soon put them back on the path to trial.

 Tell others to watch it too! Share the film with everyone you know: friends, family, neighbors, co-workers.

Get Ready to Watch!
One of the simplest but most powerful actions members of our community can take to support these young climate leaders in this moment is to watch the film and share it with others. Help spread the word so that people around the world learn about their case and the durable, sustainable solution to the accelerating climate crisis that these young people are seeking in our courts.

League Position on Climate Change

State and local Leagues, and individual League members, have a critical role to play in helping to limit future climate change and protect the planet.

The League is calling for prompt action to cut this country’s GHG emissions, invest in a clean energy economy, and help the world’s poorest countries tackle the challenges of climate change.

The League believes that climate change is a serious threat facing our nation and planet. The League believes that an international approach to combating climate change — including through energy conservation, air pollution controls, building resilience, and promotion of renewable resources — is necessary to protect public health and defend the overall integrity of the global ecosystem. The League supports climate goals and policies that are consistent with the best available climate science and that will ensure a stable climate system for future generations. Individuals, communities, and governments must continue to address this issue, while considering the ramifications of their decisions, at all levels — local, state, regional, national, and global.

LWV Oregon Gun Safety Portfolio

What’s Happening?

We would like to bring to your attention to the following information in the hopes of increasing awareness of Oregon gun violence prevention efforts.

There are two initiatives, IP 17 and 18 currently circulating for the 2022 General Election to reduce gun violence. Since the League has a policy of not taking a stand on initiatives before they reach the ballot, consider the following to be information only and not an official League endorsement.

The petitions are sponsored by the faith-based coalition Lift Every Voice Oregon and supported by a cadre of organizations and volunteers from across the state:

  • Initiative Petition 17: Requires permit to acquire firearms; police maintain permit/firearm database; criminally prohibits certain ammunition magazines
  • Initiative Petition 18: Prohibits manufacturing/possessing/transferring many semiautomatic firearms; criminal penalties; exceptions require firearm registration, restrict use

How is this related to the League?

The League of Women Voters holds positions on gun safety. Thus the Oregon efforts tie in to national focus on this matter.

Here’s an example of league action on gun control. On November 3rd, 2021, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v Bruen, marking one of the first times that the Supreme Court addressed the scope of the Second Amendment since 2008.   In September 2021, LWVUS, alongside the Leagues of Women Voters of New York and Florida, filed an amicus brief in this case.

The Impact of Gun Laws on Elections 

The amicus brief argued that the New York law is in line with the types of regulations that are allowed under the Second Amendment because it protects the safety of the electoral process.  

There is a long history of firearms being used to intimidate voters, especially voters of color. One Supreme Court Justice concluded that since the beginning of Reconstruction, there has been a “coordinated [system] of intimidation and violence” against voters of color. This history has continued with the wave of voter intimidation in the past few elections. 

Throughout this history of attempts to intimidate voters, the League has fought to secure the safety of election sites. One example is during the 2020 election, when the League fought to protect voters from violence at polling locations in Council on American-Islamic Relations of Minnesota (CAIR-MN) v Atlas Aegis. In this case, a private, armed mercenary organization was hired to monitor various polling sites to prevent “voter fraud.” A federal district court judge blocked the organization from deploying members to intimidate voters and issued a five-year consent decree that prevented actions like this from happening in the future.  

Empirical evidence also shows that guns increase the likelihood of violence during disagreements, and as our amicus brief points out, “conflicts arise at every phase of the electoral process — between voters who support opposing candidates, between protesters and counter-protesters at politically charged rallies, or with election officials counting votes — voters frightful of mixing guns with unrest may limit voting-related activity or even sit out of the electoral process entirely.” 

Ensuring the safety of the elections and the public’s safety while exercising their right to vote is critical. Laws like the ones that have been passed in New York are meant to ensure states and localities have the flexibility and freedom to create laws and regulations that best suit the needs of their communities while protecting the safety of sensitive areas like polling locations. 

LWV will continue to support laws that protect and empower Americans within both our democratic system and daily life.

Who else is working on this issue?

The League of Women Voters works with the Center for American Progress, an independent, nonpartisan policy institute that is dedicated to improving the lives of all Americans through bold, progressive ideas, as well as strong leadership and concerted action.

HERE is an example of their recent report on prevention of gun violence.

Health Reform and Social Justice: Opportunities for Reducing Inequity and Addressing Health Disparities

An Evening with Dr. Susan Rogers, President of Physicians for a National Health Program, October 6, 2021

LWV Klamath County was one of many leagues across the country which co-sponsored this ZOOM presentation.

For this event, the League hosted an evening with Dr. Susan Rogers, President of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP). Dr. Rogers’s presentation included an overview of the U.S. health care system through a social justice lens, followed by a discussion highlighting disparities resulting from our current policies and opportunities to improve inequities through health reform. The forum concluded with an audience Q&A.

Dr. Rogers is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Rush University. She has recently retired from her hospitalist practice in Chicago at Stroger Hospital of Cook County. She has previously served as co-director of medical student teaching at Stroger and as Medical Director of Near North Health Service Corp, a Chicago FQHC. Most recently, Dr. Rogers spoke at the June California League of Women Voters Annual Convention, providing the presentation: “Health Care: Inequities and Opportunities”.

This forum aimed to educate voters about our current healthcare model and how it impacts local care access, affordability, quality and equity. Our guest speaker provideed insights into how health reform can improve each of these to optimize community health and wellness. The LWVDA supports the National League healthcare positions in support of an affordable, accessible, quality, and equitable health care system, critical for the health, safety and economic security of all communities. Becoming an informed voter is fundamental to ensuring the engagement needed to affect meaningful reform. The future of our community health and healthcare systems will rely upon votes cast by those with a better understanding of current needs and resources and our opportunities to enact needed change.

The Health Reform Forum recording is available here:
https://lwvdavisarea.org
and on You tube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huDne6aR4W8

why the league of women voters?

LWV Position: Health Care Reform

Every U.S. resident should have access to affordable, quality health care, including birth control and the privacy to make reproductive choices.  

Why it matters

The U.S. health care system should provide a basic level of quality health care at an affordable cost to all U.S. residents. Basic care includes disease prevention, primary care (including prenatal and reproductive health), acute long-term care, mental health care, as well as health promotion and education. Health care policy goals should include the equitable distribution of services and delivery of care, advancement of medical research and technology, and a reasonable total national expenditure level. 

What we’re doing

Over the past 20 years, we have lobbied for health care policy solutions, including the Affordable Care Act (ACA), to control costs and ensure a basic level of care for all. Throughout the health care debates of the past few decades, Leagues worked to provide millions of Americans across the country with objective information about the health care system and its significant reforms. This included organizing community education projects, holding public forums and debates, creating and distributing resource materials, and engaging leading policy makers and analysts. 

From the LWV Davis, California study: Some Ways to Evaluate Health and Social Care Needs in Your Community

Health, Behavioral Health, Social Services and Care Information Matrix


What should health care, social services, and behavioral health look like in your community? In your region? Those are important questions for the League to address. If we had universal health and social care in your region, what would need to be improved? What changes would your League recommend?

To cut down the confusion of the complexity of health and social services, there seems to be a natural division: Children have the same developmental issues; Adults have the same issues, generally. Each has Acute Care, Institutional, Behavioral Health and Social Care needs; and the system data needs to be managed:

Children: Acute Care, Institutional, Behavioral Health, Social Care, Data/Information

Institutional: clinics, hospitals, emergency rooms, rehabilitation and physical therapy, board and care homes, prisons and jails, in home support services


Behavioral Health (kids, adults, institutions, social services, data/info)
Social Services: housing, employment, transportation, child care, access to health and social services


Data/Information: patient-focused clinic computer program with daily accountability to federal and state standards that are updated annually; document patient care; employee activity; finances; quality control; planning, audit, program evaluation: the daily data/information management structure of a single payer system.

For further information READ this Workbook for Social and Health Care: Questions, Studies, Educational Forums and Organizing

New LWV Oregon Study: PESTICIDES and BIOCIDES

Over the past two years, the LWV of Portland OR in cooperation with the state LWV has been working on a new study. This means that once local leagues reach consensus to support this study, it becomes an official platform that the League can use to advocate for various policy positions and actions. This is how the League works: we study an issue, reach consensus and then use that information to support or oppose various public policies and actions. We remain non-partisan; this is an issue, not a party or candidate. LWV Klamath County plans to support this study.

Summary of new study:

The use of pesticides is a balancing act between advantages and disadvantages. Understanding the impacts, both beneficial and adverse, requires a broad overview of prevailing policy and the effects that policy has had. This study reviews the environmental and health costs and benefits of pesticide use, the current state of regulation at the federal, state, and local level, and the practices and precautions presently in place for their use. It reviews potential improvements to regulations and changes to practices that could improve outcomes and protect the environment and human health while maintaining a stable, safe, and reliable supply of foods and other farmed products.

Five key areas of pesticide development, use, and policy were identified for review and potential improvements:

  1. Education, training, and labeling  
  2. Transparency and information gathering 
  3. Funding, research, and evaluation  
  4. Adaptive management and Integrated Pest Management  
  5. Burden of proof and the precautionary principle.

Impacts of and Issues Surrounding Pesticide Use


Because pesticides are essentially chemical poisons or biological agents that make compounds toxic to certain species, their use must be considered in the light of their overall effects…. While pesticides are brought to market after extensive research and testing, we constantly learn new information about environmental ecosystems and human and animal physiology that may cause us to reexamine how, when or if they should be used. As human populations have increased, the need to develop a safe and stable supply of food and non-food crops has also grown. Control of disease carrying insects and animal carriers is increasingly necessary, especially as the global climate changes. These benefits must be balanced with the potential harm their use may cause.

Read the entire study HERE.

You may also view a panel discussion held on this topic HERE.

Further Reading:

https://www.opb.org/article/2020/12/15/oregon-pesticides-chlorpyrifos-christimas-trees-chemicals/

https://www.oregon.gov/oda/programs/pesticides/pages/aboutpesticides.aspx

https://oregonforests.org/herbicides

Jordan Cove Project: Further News

August 19, 2021:

Jordan Cove LNG Forfeits Permits Required for Export Terminal & Pipeline 
Community members celebrate as Pembina misses the deadline to reapply for three permits, adding to the long list of setbacks for the proposed Jordan Cove LNG export terminal and Pacific Connector pipeline.  

Note the critical role Jackson County’s own attorney Tonia Moro played in these wins. And we are once again so grateful to the LWVOR for helping to support her work on these land use permits! And thanks, too, to Tonia’s partners in arms at the Crag Law Center–Courtney Johnson and Anu Sawkar–and to Citizens for Renewables and Oregon Shores for heading up and supporting this fight in the community. There are plenty of other kudos to go around, but we want to be sure to acknowledge the hard, often overlooked work of Dr. Christine Moffitt of the Coos County LWV and other scientists who provided factual proof of the horrendous harm to marine flora and fauna these permits ignored when they were granted.

September 8, 2021, from Inside Climate News:

To Meet Paris Accord Goal, Most of the World’s Fossil Fuel Reserves Must Stay in the Ground

A new study in Nature reports that oil, gas and coal production must begin falling immediately to have even a 50 percent chance of keeping global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

September 12, 2021, from State of Oregon, Department of Environmental Quality Report:

Jordan Cove Energy Project (Coos Bay) The Jordan Cove Energy Project had indicated in recent court filings that they have put their project on pause, due to recent FERC decisions. Jordan Cove has not formally notified DEQ of any intent to withdraw currently pending applications, but has verbally indicated intent to withdraw Air Quality permit applications for the North Spit facility and Malin Compressor Station. Water Quality and Solid Waste permits are scheduled to be renewed whether the energy project goes forward or not, as both the NPDES permit and Solid Waste permit are associated with the site of the former Weyco facility. FERC clarified in a recent letter, excerpted below, that they consider the project to remain active, though paused. “Due to the uncertainty regarding a timeline for the Project and concerns with the Programmatic Agreement, commenters and signatories to the PA have requested that the PA be terminated or significant amendments be made to the PA. Although the project Item K 000011 Informational item: Director’s report Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 2021, EQC meeting Page 12 of 12 proponents have chosen to pause the development of the Project, the Commission’s March 19, 2020 Order granting Authorizations Under Sections 3 and 7 of the Natural Gas Act (Order) remains valid. Therefore, we have concluded that it would be inappropriate to terminate the PA at this time. We have also concluded that amendments to the PA at this time are premature, given the pause in project development. Should the project proponents choose to resume development of the Project, Commission environmental staff, in consultation with the SHPO and ACHP, and other concerned parties including federally-recognized Indian Tribes would reassess the status of the Programmatic Agreement and would at that time consider amendments to the PA to ensure that its aims and goals are successfully met and that any outstanding requirements are appropriately satisfied.”   

Current Issue: Health Care Reform

Introduction: Why the League of Women Voters?

Because the LWV has studied this issue and taken an official position. As a local league, we follow under the umbrella of national positions on various issues of public interest. Health and medicine are fundamental human rights, not partisan talking points.

Health Care Reform: LWV Official Position

Every U.S. resident should have access to affordable, quality health care, including birth control and the privacy to make reproductive choices.  

Why it matters

The U.S. health care system should provide a basic level of quality health care at an affordable cost to all U.S. residents. Basic care includes disease prevention, primary care (including prenatal and reproductive health), acute long-term care, mental health care, as well as health promotion and education. Health care policy goals should include the equitable distribution of services and delivery of care, advancement of medical research and technology, and a reasonable total national expenditure level. 

What we’re doing

Over the past 20 years, we have lobbied for health care policy solutions, including the Affordable Care Act (ACA), to control costs and ensure a basic level of care for all. Throughout the health care debates of the past few decades, Leagues worked to provide millions of Americans across the country with objective information about the health care system and its significant reforms. This included organizing community education projects, holding public forums and debates, creating and distributing resource materials, and engaging leading policy makers and analysts. 

How does universal health coverage work? An International View

Who’s Involved in this?

A number of groups are focusing on reforming health care at the national and state levels. Here are several:

Physicians for a National Health Care Plan** (see below)

Physicians for a National Health Care Plan OREGON

American Association of Family Practitioners

Health Care Reform and LWV Klamath County**

On Wednesday October 6, 2021 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm PT, the League of Women Voters Davis Area will be hosting a virtual Community Forum, “Health Reform & Social Justice: Opportunities for Reducing Inequity and Addressing Health Disparities”. LWV Klamath County will be one of many co-sponsors of this event.

Register at https://lwvdaforum.eventbrite.com

For this event, the League will be hosting an evening with Dr. Susan Rogers, President of Physicians for a National Health Plan (PNHP). Dr. Rogers’s presentation will include an overview of the U.S. health care system through a social justice lens, followed by a discussion highlighting disparities resulting from our current policies and opportunities to improve inequities through health reform. The forum will conclude with an audience Q&A.


Dr. Rogers is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Rush University. She has recently retired from her hospitalist practice in Chicago at Stroger Hospital of Cook County. She has previously served as co-director of medical student teaching at Stroger and as Medical Director of Near North Health Service Corp, a Chicago FQHC. Most recently, Dr. Rogers spoke at the June California League of Women Voters Annual Convention, providing the presentation: “Health Care: Inequities and Opportunities”.


This forum aims to educate voters about our current healthcare model and how it impacts local care access, affordability, quality and equity. Our guest speaker provides insights into how health reform can improve each of these to optimize community health and wellness. The LWVDA supports the National League healthcare positions in support of an affordable, accessible, quality, and equitable health care system, critical for the health, safety and economic security of all communities. Becoming an informed voter is fundamental to ensuring the engagement needed to affect meaningful reform. The future of our community health and healthcare systems will rely upon votes cast by those with a better understanding of current needs and resources and our opportunities to enact needed change.


To help speakers best address your concerns, questions, and issues, we encourage attendees to please submit them in advance to komalh@lwvdavisarea.org before October 4.

We encourage you to sign up for this virtual forum and hope that you will spread the word to other voters you know. Health and Medicine aren’t partisan issues, but fundamental human rights.

Redistricting in Oregon 2021

It’s happening now!

Every 10 years, the US Census requires that states must redraw legislative and congressional electoral districts to account for population changes. Currently, these districts in Oregon are drawn by legislators and are subject to a veto by the Governor. If legislators cannot agree on maps, the job falls to the Secretary of State for legislative districts, and to a panel of five judges for congressional districts.

That’s why we need YOU! District lines determine where money will be allocated for things like schools, hospitals, and infrastructureYou have the power to testify for or against the currently proposed maps or to draw maps to submit for consideration. You can affect where the lines are drawn and what communities are combined into a district.  

We need FAIR and EQUAL redistricting for fair representation for all communities of Oregon. Make your voice heard and read on to learn more. The League of Women Voters of Oregon is extremely concerned about this topic of voting rights in our state. Check their page for lots of information including maps and other links.

Of course the Oregon State Legislature is directly responsible for redistricting. On their page you can find all the relevant information about the process, key deadlines, hearings and documents.

Finally the national League also maintains a policy position on redistricting, as part of their work on voting rights.

Join the Fight 

There are many ways you can get involved in ensuring equity for all communities in this year’s map-drawing process! 

Learn More

Here are some more links to read up on this topic.

Oregon Public Broadcasting

AP News

Project Five Thirty Eight

LWV Oregon New Position on Forests

Delegates to the LWVOR Convention 2021 adopted a position statement on Forests based on the LWV of Washington study entitled Washington’s Dynamic Forests (PART 1) (PART 2) .

LWVOR Position on Forests (2021)

The League of Women Voters of Oregon finds:

1: That all benefits of the forests—ecological,human and economic—are inextricably interconnected. Healthy forests are essential to habitat for a diversity of plant and animal life, to the hydrologic cycle, and to carbon storage to mitigate global warming. In addition, healthy forests are essential to a forest products industry with the jobs and goods they provide, and to the economic and aesthetic values of their recreational opportunities. Therefore, The League of Women Voters of Oregon supports:

2: Laws and policies to insure that forest management (for timber extraction, recreation or any other activity) is carried out in a manner that will sustain healthy forests, streams and habitats. The League of Women Voters of Oregon believes that the following are essential elements of an adequate forest practices policy:

3: The public must be informed and involved in the decision-making process in the development of regulations. There must be adequate public notice of forest practices permit applications, hearings, meetings and proposed actions. Public review and comment at each phase of policy and regulation development should be required. Citizens and stakeholders must be represented on the decision making bodies.

4: There must be authority and funding for enforcement of regulations. Existing land use and forest practices regulations must be monitored and enforced, and should be responsive to changing scientific knowledge. There must be coordination of regulations for public and private lands among governmental entities.

5: Riparian zones are an integral part of the forest ecosystem and must be regulated adequately to protect the streams and the wildlife dependent upon the streams.

6: Education should be made available to timber owners on scientifically sound forest practices with the establishment of a small landowners’ agency for this purpose.

7: Environmental values of the lands proposed for trade must be considered before the economic values. Trained appraisers, with public oversight, must be used. The right of appeal must be available to the public

8: Full accounting of all costs, including cumulative ecological impacts, of timber harvests and other forest uses must be considered in forest activity decisions.

9: Forest management must be responsive to scientific research and knowledge and should include:

· mapping, classification and protection of all streams,

· more and better data—including total watershed analysis,

· evaluation of cumulative effects of various activities in the forest in the consideration of individual forest practice permits, and

· planning for sustainability of forest ecosystems.

10: The State should consider ecological protections the most important factor in deciding which activities to allow on state forest lands.

11: Motorized activities should be restricted and in separate areas from non-motorized activities.

12: Forest roads must be built, maintained and decommissioned to have the least impact on the forest ecosystems. Some areas on state lands should be roadless.

13: Educate consumers about the human and ecological values of our forests as well as the opportunities and benefits of more efficient use of forest products, recycling and the use of alternatives to wood.

14: Fund independent scientific research that would include improved forest practices and ecologically sound alternatives to the use of wood.

15: Tax benefits and compensation should be considered to encourage small landowners to manage their forests in an ecologically sustainable manner.

16: Oregon schools must be fully funded with less reliance on timber harvests.

17: Trust lands should remain in public ownership.

The LWVOR Convention of 2021 adopted these position statements based on the LWVWA studies entitled: Washington’s Dynamic Forests.

Would you like to learn more or support this effort? See the links below.

https://oregonwild.org/forests/forest-protection-and-restoration

https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/FF/Pages/Forestland-Protection.aspx

https://www.sierraclub.org/oregon/protect-our-wild-forests

https://oregonforests.org/habitat-protection

https://www.oregonloggers.org/Forest_Sustainability_Environment.aspx

https://www.wilderness.org/wild-places/oregon/logging-oregons-wild-forests#

https://oregonwildlands.org/

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI)

LWV policy applies to all leagues

LWV Klamath County, as part of the state and national league organizations, has been introduced to the topic of DEL in a summer workshop, and we plan to include relevant language in our by-laws at an upcoming meeting. Below you will see the LWV national policy, definitions, and a list of further resources.

what can you do?

First you should watch this LWV US training webinar HERE.

Second you can learn about the LWV US policy and relevant definitions.

Then you can read up on this topic from articles and books listed below.

Finally you can JOIN US as we work to incorporate these concepts into our local LWV Klamath County and our work here. Attend an upcoming meeting to speak up on DEI.

LWV Policy

LWV is an organization fully committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion in principle and in practice. Diversity, equity, and inclusion are central to the organization’s current and future success in engaging all individuals, households, communities, and policy makers in creating a more perfect democracy.

There shall be no barriers to full participation in this organization on the basis of gender, gender identity, ethnicity, race, native or indigenous origin, age, generation, sexual orientation, culture, religion, belief system, marital status, parental status, socioeconomic status, language, accent, ability status, mental health, educational level or background, geography, nationality, work style, work experience, job role function, thinking style, personality type, physical appearance, political perspective or affiliation and/or any other characteristic that can be identified as recognizing or illustrating diversity.

Defining DEI

Diversity, equity, and inclusion are mutually reinforcing. Increased inclusion is associated with increased equity; the majority of organizations with higher inclusion and equity also have greater demographic diversity.

DIVERSITY

Diversity includes all of the similarities and differences among people, not limited to: gender, gender identity, ethnicity, race, native or indigenous origin, age, generation, sexual orientation, culture, religion, belief system, marital status, parental status, socioeconomic status, appearance, language, accent, ability status, mental health, education, geography, nationality, work style, work experience, job role function, thinking style, personality type, physical appearance, and political perspective or affiliation.

Diversity refers to population groups that have been historically underrepresented in socially, politically, or economically powerful institutions and organizations. These groups include but are not restricted to populations of color, such as African Americans and Blacks, Latinx, Native Americans and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. They may also include lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations, people with disabilities, women, and other groups.

A team can be diverse and so can an organization. A person is not diverse. Diversity is about a collective or a group and can only exist in relationship to others. A candidate is not diverse—they are a unique, individual unit. They may bring diversity to your team, but they in themselves are not diverse. They are a woman; they are a person of color; they are part of the LGBTQ community.

We commit to increase diversity in the recruitment, retention, and retainment at the national, state, and local level, and in the leadership and executive roles.

EQUITY

Equity is an approach based in fairness to ensuring everyone is given equal opportunity; this means that resources may be divided and shared unequally to make sure that each person has a fair chance to succeed. Equity takes into account that people have different access to resources because of system of oppression and privilege. Equity seeks to balance that disparity.

Improving equity involves increasing justice and fairness within the procedures and processes of institutions or systems, as well as in their distribution of resources, including professional growth opportunities. Tackling equity issues requires an understanding of the root causes of outcome disparities within our society.

Equity prioritizes efforts to ensure the most underserved and marginalized among us has as much of an opportunity to succeed as the most well-served and advantaged. By taking into account the various advantages and disadvantages that people face, we work to ensure every person has an equal opportunity to succeed.

We commit to prioritizing equity in the work of the LWV staff, board, and members.

INCLUSION

Inclusion is an ongoing process, not a static state of being.

Inclusion is the dynamic state of operating in which diversity is leveraged to create a healthy, high-performing organization and community.

Inclusion refers to the degree to which diverse individuals are able to participate fully in the decision-making processes within an organization or group.

An inclusive environment ensures equitable access to resources and opportunities for all. It also enables individuals and groups to feel safe, respected, engaged, motivated, and valued for who they are and for their contributions toward organizational and societal goals.

While an inclusive group is by definition diverse, a diverse group is not always inclusive. Being aware of unconscious or implicit bias can help organizations better address issues of inclusivity.

We commit to making deliberate efforts to ensure LWV is a place where differences are welcomed, different perspectives are respectfully heard, and every individual feels a sense of belonging and inclusion. We know that by creating a vibrant climate of inclusiveness, we can more effectively leverage our resources to advance our collective capabilities.

We commit to working actively to challenge and respond to bias, harassment, and discrimination.

Seeing our work through a DEI Lens

A DEI lens is a way of examining a program, a process, a product, etc. with regards to how it is perceived by a variety of communities, voices, and perspectives, and what, if any, barriers may exist that is preventing it from being equitable or inclusive of everyone.

What To Ask When Examining Your Work Through a DEI Lens

  • Who is involved in the process?
    • Are key stakeholders meaningfully included?
    • Is this work that impacts a group or community? If so, is their voice represented?
    • How diverse is the group of decision makers? Is it diverse enough?
  • Who will be impacted?
    • Who benefits from this?
    • Who is burdened by this?
    • Does this help us meet the needs of underserved voters?
    • Have we considered various, specific marginalized groups and how they might be impacted?
  • What are the intended and unintended outcomes?
    • What issue are we trying to solve?
    • What do we hope will happen?
    • What are the potential negative impacts? Who could be hurt by this?
    • What data or evidence supports this?
    • How might this be perceived by others?
  • Does this align with our vision for an equitable and inclusive organization?
    • How is equity addressed?
    • What barriers might this place in the way of achieving equity?
    • How does this impact the League’s culture?
  • What changes could be made to make this more equitable?
    • What are the short term goals?
    • What are the long term goals?
    • What, if any, policies or bylaws need to be added or amended?
    • What are the benefits for members?
    • What are the benefits for partners and/or members of the community?

Learn More

Articles

Books

  • Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People, Mahzarin Banaji
  • Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, Malcolm Gladwell
  • Braving the Wilderness, Brené Brown
  • Everyday Bias, Howard Ross
  • The Hate U Give, Angie Thomas
  • The Hillbilly Elegy, JD Vance
  • Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces that Shape Our Decisions, Arielly, Daniel
  • Waking Up White, Debby Irving
  • The Warmth of Other Suns, Isabel Wilkerson

Audio

TED Talks

The Danger of a Single Story: TED Talk by Chimamanda Adichie on the theme of how only knowing one story of a culture can enhance our implicit biases and create incomplete pictures of those different from us. 

Other Learning Resources

What is DEI?

The Human Rights Special Interest Group

The LWV of Klamath County links its work with both the Oregon and US Leagues in many areas. Here is a relatively new effort to link national and local league efforts toward the goal of promoting Human Rights. This particular effort originated with the Mid-Hudson (NY) Region LWV. They are motivated to inspire local community efforts to educate, advocate and implement international human rights policies and goals.

Who we are


The Human Rights Special Interest Group (HR-SIG) is a non-profit, research- based, independent entity.  Our mission is to inspire local community efforts to educate, advocate, and implement international human rights policies and goals. (Please see our bios on page 74.)


You may know of our Human Rights Special Interest Group through our recent presentations on “Inspirational Works of Art at the UN”  and our Briefing Book on Human Rights: The Synergy Between UN Human Rights Conventions and Policies of the League of Women Voters.

Ways we Promote United Nations Goals

We are delighted to share our latest publication:
Human Rights Approach to Achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals
Inspiration for Program Planners and Human Rights Advocates

In a reader-friendly format, this publication reviews the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that constitute the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development—the UN’s blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. Please read the inspirational words on human rights by UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, on the 75th  anniversary of the United Nations in September 2020 (page 5). 


The 17 SDG reviews are designed to guide readers using the T.I.P.S. approach (Targets, Indicators, Policies, and Suggestions). The TIPS approach was developed by the Human Rights Special Interest Group. For each review, we have added relevant links to priorities presented in the League of Women Voters’ Impact on Issues; we conclude each review with a set of suggestions for how Leagues and community groups can implement the goals at the local level.

LWV Klamath County and Human Rights

What have we been doing here? Last summer the LWV Oregon presented a virtual caucus at the LWV Convention, entitled “Climate Migration, Immigration, and Human Rights”. Watch the video presentation HERE.

HERE are further notes and resources compiled the LWV Oregon.

If you would like to get involved, join us, come to our meetings, offer suggestions, volunteer to help, help us connect with local, regional, and other groups which focus on human rights.